12 July, 2021
Best Beaches Hong Kong: Tai Long Wan
Best Beaches Hong Kong: Tai Long Wan
Summer, What's On HK

Your Guide To The Best Beaches In Hong Kong

12 July, 2021
Best Beaches Hong Kong: Tai Long Wan

Looking to enjoy a day by the sea? Here’s a roundup of the best beaches in Hong Kong to explore now.

Spend the day at one of these Hong Kong beaches and feel worlds away. Whether you’re looking for a spot to sunbathe or prefer a beach with more shade, fancy a dip in the water or plan to have a barbecue with friends, Hong Kong has it all. Some of these sandy havens only take a short bus ride to get to, while others take a little more effort, but we promise these beaches are all worth the trip. Scroll through for the best beaches in Hong Kong, along with details on how to get there.

Read more: Top Beachside Restaurants And Bars In Hong Kong

Jump to:
Hong Kong Island Beaches
New Territories Beaches
Lantau Beaches
Lamma Island Beaches
Cheung Chau Beaches

The Best Beaches In Hong Kong

Hong Kong Island Beaches

Hong Kong Beaches: Stanley Main Beach

Stanley Main Beach

Wander along the boardwalk and choose from the many seafront restaurants, or pick up some groceries from the supermarket in Stanley Plaza and have your own beachside BBQ. Stanley Main Beach is a great place to cool down after completing The Twins hike. It’s also home to the annual Dragon Boat races, so keep your eye out for team practices during the season.

Facilities: Restaurants, changing rooms, showers, public toilets, barbecue pits

How to get there: From Central Exchange Square, take bus 6, 6A, 6X or 260, and alight at Stanley Village bus stop. You can also hop on the same buses from Connaught Road outside City Hall and Queensway at Admiralty MTR Station. To reach the beach, follow Stanley Beach Road for about 200 metres from the bus stop.


St. Stephen’s Beach

This secluded pick is just a five-minute walk from Stanley Main Beach, but it feels like an entirely different world. Though it is smaller than other beaches in the area, it is far less crowded. Best of all, it’s shaded!

Features: Changing rooms, showers, public toilets, barbecue pits

How to get there: Follow the above directions to get to Stanley Village bus stop. Walk along Stanley Beach Road for about 200 metres to find Wong Ma Kok Road, and then follow it down to St. Stephen’s Beach.


Shek O Beach

A popular beach to cool off at after hiking Dragon’s back, Shek O Beach is ever popular with locals and tourists alike. Go prepared and enjoy a seaside barbecue at one of the many pits by the sand. It’s best to arrive as early as possible as the barbecues are available on a first-come-first-serve basis!

Facilities: Cafés, changing rooms, showers, public toilets, barbecue pits

How to get there: Take the MTR to Shau Kei Wan, find exit A3 and then take bus 9, or a taxi, to Shek O. It should take about half an hour to reach Shek O Beach.

Read more: The Best Beginner Hikes In Hong Kong


Hong Kong Beaches: Lo So Shing

Shek O Back Beach

A five-minute walk from the main Shek O Beach – Shek O Back Beach is a dog-friendly paradise. Another draw is that it tends to be quieter as it’s a little hidden, and crowds are normally drawn to the main beach.

Facilities: Cafés, changing rooms, showers, public toilets and barbecue pits

How to get there: Follow the directions to Shek O beach and get off at the Shek O Bus Terminus. Head towards the colourful houses when entering Shek O Village, and the paved road will lead you to Shek O Back Beach.

Read more: The Best Dog-Friendly Beaches, Restaurants, Hikes And Parks


Big Wave Bay

Just down the road from Shek O is Big Wave Bay, Hong Kong’s only officially recognised surf beach. For this reason, its main clientele are surfers who take advantage of the waves and consistent swell (did the name not give that away?). Surfer or not, it’s a clean and scenic beach – not a bad spot for downing a couple of cold beers.

Facilities: Cafés, changing rooms, showers, public toilets, barbecue pits

How to get there: Take the MTR to Shau Kei Wan, find exit A3 and then take bus 9, or a taxi, to Shek O. Get off at the junction of Shek O Road with Big Wave Bay Road, and walk about 10 minutes to Big Wave Bay Village and beach.


Deep Water Bay

The (somewhat) quieter little sister to Repulse Bay Beach, Deep Water Bay is again located just up the hill from two of the busiest beaches on Hong Kong Island. It’s a favourite of locals and early morning swimmers, and with more than 30 barbecue pits, it’s a popular beach for groups too!

Facilities: A café, changing rooms, showers, public toilets, barbecue pits

How to get there: Follow the above directions to Stanley, but alight earlier at the Deep Water Bay bus stop.


Repulse Bay Beach hong kong

Repulse Bay Beach

Lying just up the hill from Stanley, Repulse Bay is another popular choice for weekend beachgoers. The beach here is bigger than at Stanley, but it still gets pretty crowded as it’s one of Hong Kong’s most accessible beaches. Get there early to snag a good spot on the sand and be sure to stop for lunch along the boardwalk.

Facilities: Restaurants, changing rooms, showers, public toilets

How to get there: Follow the above directions to Stanley, but alight earlier at the Repulse Bay Beach bus stop. Once off the bus, cross the road and make your way down the steps to the beach.

Read more: Your Neighbourhood Guide To Repulse Bay


Chung Hom Kok

Tucked around the corner from Stanley lies Chung Hom Kok, a quaint little beach that has “urban hideaway” written all over it. Easily accessible but slightly tricky to find, this beach is a three-minute walk down a leafy park directly off a quiet residential street (meaning it’s nowhere near as busy as the beaches in Repulse Bay or Stanley!).

Facilities: Changing rooms, showers, public toilets, barbecue pits

How to get there: From Central Exchange Square take bus 6X, 63, 66, or 973 to Chung Hom Kok Beach bus stop, on Chung Hom Kok Road.


New Territories Beaches

Lung Mei Beach, Tai Po

Lung Mei Beach

Been there, done that when it comes to beaches in Hong Kong? Newly opened Lung Mei Beach should tide you over while you dream of returning to the sandy shores of Phuket and Bali. Found not far from Tai Mei Tuk and the Plover Cove Reservoir, this pristine 200-metre long man-made stretch of sand comes complete with a long observation deck ideal for sunset watching.

Facilities: Changing rooms, shower facilities, public toilets

How to get there: From Tai Po Market Station MTR, take bus 75K or 275R (available on Sundays and public holidays only) or green minibus 20C. Alight at the Lo Tsz Tin stop and walk about two minutes to the beach.

Read more: What To Know About Hong Kong’s New Lung Mei Beach In Tai Po


Golden Beach

Catch golden hour at this 545-metre stretch of sand imported from Hainan Island, or take a stroll down the seaside promenade. Golden Beach is the largest public beach in Tuen Mun. Complete with tropical trees, refreshment kiosks, a hotel (Hong Kong Gold Coast Hotel) and shopping centre right by the beach, you’ll feel like you’re on holiday in no time!

Facilities: Restaurants, public toilets, changing rooms, showers

How to get there: Take the K53 bus from Tuen Mun Station and alight at Golden Beach. Alternatively, you can take the 962N bus from Causeway Bay (Moreton Terrace) or 252B bus from Middle Road, Tsim Sha Tsui.


Hong Kong Beach: Turtle Cove Beach

Turtle Cove Beach

A small stretch of soft sand bordered by lush greenery, this secluded cove is nestled between Stanley and Tai Tam Reservoir. There aren’t any food or drinks stalls nearby or much shade at this beach, so be sure to pack a lunch and a wide-rimmed hat. It’s worth noting that Turtle Cove Beach is the last known nesting place for Hong Kong’s endangered green turtles, and is closed between June and October; though sadly no turtles have been spotted on the beach for some time now.

Facilities: Barbecue pits, changing rooms, shower facilities, public toilets

How to get there: Take the MTR to Sai Wan Ho, find exit A and then take bus 14. Alight after the Tai Tam Reservoir stop and follow the steps down to the Turtle Cove Beach.


Tai Long Wan (Sai Wan, Ham Tin Wan, Tai Wan And Tung Wan)

A favourite for many in Hong Kong, the beaches of Tai Long Wan are most definitely worth the journey. Made up of four beaches along the bay – Sai Wan, Ham Tin Wan, Tai Wan and Tung Wan – Tai Long Wan is located on the east coast of the Sai Kung Peninsula. The four beaches are connected to each other by short trails, so you can easily see more than one in a day, but only Sai Wan and Ham Tin beaches have places to eat and bathroom facilities. All of the beaches are popular for camping, with equipment available to rent from a small store at Ham Tin or back in Sai Kung. Although not officially recognised as a surf spot (and with no lifeguards), the beaches here are also popular with surfing enthusiasts, with board rentals and lessons also available in Sai Wan.

Facilities: Small restaurants, public toilets, surfboard hire

How to get there: Take the MTR to Mong Kok and take Exit E2. Walk to Dundas Street and take the red minibus to Sai Kung from outside the Kwong Wah Hospital. You can also take the MTR to either Choi Hung or Hang Hau and then take a minibus to Sai Kung Town.

Once in Sai Kung, take the 29R Minibus or a green taxi to the Sai Wan Pavilion, and from here hike 90 minutes to the beach. If you’d rather skip the hike, you can also hire a boat from Sai Kung Pier that will take you to Tai Long Wan. There is no other way out of Tai Long Wan, so we prefer to hike in and get the boat home! Once you arrive at the beach you should book your departure boat home.

Read more: Your Guide To Tai Long Wan


Clearwater Bay (First & Second) Beaches

Sitting in the southeast corner of the New Territories, Clearwater Bay has two beaches. Aptly named Clearwater Bay First Beach and Clearwater Bay Second Beach, the two are separated by a short stretch of rocky coast. First Beach is a little more secluded, though only Second Beach has a small café selling refreshments.

Facilities: Changing rooms, showers, changing rooms, a small kiosk, barbecue pits, public toilets

How to get there: Take the MTR to Diamond Hill station and then catch the 91 bus. The bus first stops at Clearwater Bay First Beach bus stop, before terminating at Second Beach. The two beaches are also connected by a footpath and steps, so you can easily access both.


Long Ke Wan beach hong kong

Long Ke Wan

Along with the beaches of Tai Long Wan, Long Ke Wan is the closest we get to white sand and crystal waters in Hong Kong – travel magazines have even been known to compare this spot to the Maldives! Although it’s one of the most beautiful beaches, facilities are limited, with only dry pit toilets in sight. Be sure to bring water, food and anything you may need with you as there are no shops in the area. There is, however, a small campsite for those who truly want to escape the city and rough it for a night in the great outdoors.

Facilities: Dry pit toilets and a small campsite

How to get there: You can hike to Long Ke Wan, but the easiest way to reach this beach is by taxi. Get to Sai Kung (using the above-mentioned directions), then take a taxi from Sai Kung Town to “East Dam” of High Island Reservoir. After reaching the East Dam, walk upwards for 20 minutes and you will meet the sandy shore.


Hap Mun Bay Beach

Also known as “Half Moon Bay” because of its crescent shape, Hap Mun Bay Beach is just a short sampan ride away from Sai Kung. As one of the prettiest and easiest beaches to get to from Sai Kung, Hap Mun Bay can get very busy at weekends. It’s also one of Hong Kong’s cleanest beaches (it consistently ranks high in the water quality ratings!), making it the perfect place to enjoy a cooling swim on a sunny afternoon.

Facilities: Changing rooms, showers, campsites, barbecue pits, public toilets

How to get there: Follow the above directions to Sai Kung and then, from Sai Kung Pier, take a boat to Hap Mun Bay Beach (there will be loads of vendors selling tickets along the pier).


Lantau Beaches

Hong Kong Beach: Silvermine Bay Beach

Silvermine Bay Beach

Just a short walk from Mui Wo ferry pier, Silvermine Bay beach is considered one of the cleanest in Hong Kong. Though popular during the day, Silvermine really comes to life at night, with many enjoying the public barbecue pits and other nearby dining options.

Facilities: Restaurants, changing rooms, showers, barbecue pits, public toilets

How to get there: Take the ferry from Central Pier 6 to Mui Wo. Turn right at the pier, head towards Mui Wo Ferry Pier Road, then walk to Ngan Kwong Wan Road and along Ngan Shek Street to get to Tung Wan Tau Road and the beach.

Read more: Your Neighbourhood Guide To Mui Wo


Pui O Beach

Pui O Beach has a very relaxed, laid back vibe, and although it is popular, it never feels overwhelmingly busy. Although Mavericks is now sadly closed, you can still head to Treasure Island Beach Club (open Friday to Sunday and on public holidays) for some food and drink, before heading back down to the beach for a swim. Complete with a campsite, Pui O is a great spot for a night between sand and stars – just be wary of the water buffalo that can stray away from the nearby fields! It’s also worth noting that, although pleasant, the sand here is darker and quite sticky – so don’t visit and expect to find an idyllic white sand beach.

Facilities: Restaurant, changing rooms, showers, campsites, barbecue pits, public toilets

How to get there: Take the ferry from Central Pier 6 to Mui Wo, then take bus 1 to Pui O Beach (about 15 minutes). Alternatively, take the MTR to Tung Chung and then take the 3M bus, which should take about 20 minutes. Cross the road and walk down the path that leads to the beach.


Upper and Lower Cheung Sha Beaches

Located on southern Lantau, Cheung Sha is one of Hong Kong’s longest beaches. Stretching around 3km, you’ll find two beaches here – Lower Cheung Sha and Upper Cheung Sha. Lower Cheung Sha Beach has more restaurants and tends to be busier, so if you want to escape the crowds, stick to Upper Cheung Sha Beach.

Facilities: Restaurants, changing rooms, showers, barbecue pits, public toilets

How to get there: Take the ferry from Central Pier 6 to Mui Wo. Then take the 1, 2 or 4 bus to Lower Cheung Sha Village – it’s then about a 5-minute walk to either beach. Alternatively, take the MTR to Tung Chung and then take the 11 or 23 bus, which should take about 20 minutes to Lower Cheung Sha Village. From there, it’s about a 5-minute walk to the beach.


Lamma Beaches

Hong Kong Beaches: Lo So Shing

Lo So Shing Beach

Lo So Shing is a small little crescent-shaped beach that is adorned at the edges by thick, forested hills. Many argue that it is one of the most beautiful stretches of sand on Lamma Island! It’s also often much less crowded than other Lamma beaches, including Hung Shing Yeh Beach.

Facilities: Changing rooms, showers, barbecue pits, public toilets

How to get there: Take the ferry from Central Pier 4 to Yung Shue Wan and take the Family Walk trail. Lo So Shing Beach is a 15-minute walk from the hilltop pavilion.


Hung Shing Yeh Beach

An easy weekend getaway, Hung Shing Yeh Beach has long been adored for its clear blue waters and soft white sand. The beach is also fully equipped with all the essentials and has very good water quality. Only a 30-minute ferry ride from Central, it’s a convenient option for escaping the city, but can get busy come the weekend!

Facilities: Changing rooms, showers, barbecue pits, public toilets, lifeguards

How to get there: Take the ferry from Central Pier 4 to Yung Shue Wan and follow the Family Walk trail. Hung Shing Yeh Beach is a 30-minute walk from the hilltop pavilion.


Cheung Chau Beaches

Cheung Chau Beach

Tung Wan Beach

Don’t head home from a day at Cheung Chau without making a trip to Tung Wan Beach. It’s easy to reach and there are vendors who can rent you umbrellas, chairs and just about anything you need to make your day at the beach a great one.

Facilities: Restaurants, changing rooms, showers, barbecue pits, public toilets

How to get there: Take the ferry from Central Pier 5 (the slow boat takes 55 minutes, the fast one takes 35 minutes). From the Cheung Chau Ferry Pier, walk along Tung Wan Road for about 10 minutes until you reach Tung Wan Beach.

Read more: Your Neighbourhood Guide To Cheung Chau


Kwun Yam Beach

Next to Tung Wan Beach, Kwun Yam Wan is a go-to destination for windsurfing and kayaking. The Cheung Chau Windsurfing Centre is found by the beach and can provide windsurfing, surfing and canoeing equipment for those keen to get involved.

Facilities: Restaurants, changing rooms, showers, barbecue pits, public toilets

How to get there: Follow the above directions to Tung Wan Beach, and then walk a further five minutes in the direction of the Warwick Hotel until you reach Kwun Yam Beach.


Editor’s Note: This article was originally published on 26 June, 2017 and was updated in July 2021.

 

Hero image courtesy of Deepali Kini, image 1 courtesy of seaonweb via Getty, image 2 courtesy of Jess Ng for Sassy Media Group, image 3 courtesy of gionnixxx via Getty, image 4 courtesy of courtesy of LCSD, image 5 courtesy of 惠民 曾 via Unsplash, image 6 courtesy of bjeayes via Getty, image 7 courtesy of Gregor Vand via Unsplash, image 8 courtesy of Sanga Park via Getty, image 9 courtesy of LewisTsePuiLung via Getty.

 

 

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